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Things Between Napoleon and SourceDay Are Heating Up

Napoleon Grill Napoleon Grill

We recently sat down with Jean Louis Marin, VP of IT & Louise Mayer, ERP Improvement Manager at Napoleon to learn how launching a cloud supplier collaboration platform impacted their business. We were excited to learn that after adopting SourceDay, Napoleon increased their on-time delivery by 35%, decreased invoice errors by 90%, and saved their buyers 1-2 hours a day.

For more than 40 years, Napoleon Products managed supplier pricing, quantity, and lead-time data through email, spreadsheets, and phone calls. However, as the company started to grow, their team struggled to maintain customer satisfaction and avoid product margin erosion. With SourceDay’s PO and AP solution, Napoleon gained the visibility necessary to cost-effectively deliver against the growing demand for Napoleon products.

At the root of Napoleon’s challenges, they needed to transform their purchasing process and automate manual procedures and make their supply chain more reliable. With SourceDay, Napoleon simplified their supplier communication and reduced mismatched AP invoices without having to maintain a supplier portal, go through complicated training, or support revisions.

SourceDay provides us a platform where communication is all orchestrated in one place… It facilitates a lot of the notification and communication processes by letting the users know when they have to take action on things. We see the ability for both users on the procurement side as well as the vendor side to get access to information very easily.”

Jean Louis Marin, VP of IT at Napoleon

Speedy Results

Napoleon went live with SourceDay in April 2018 and soon after noticed an improvement in buyer productivity, increased on-time deliveries, and stopped overpaying suppliers. Production plans became more accurate thanks to SourceDay’s software and Napoleon discovered a drastic increase in their ability to deliver to customers on time.

SourceDay paid for itself in less than 3 months.

Jean Louis Marin, VP of IT at Napoleon

Learn more about Napoleon Products and how adopting SourceDay changed their business.

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3 Ways to Improve Your Supplier Relationship

The buyer-supplier relationship can feel strained at times because so much depends on performance and orders moving smoothly. As a buyer, the development of your product and its assembly are completely dependent on your suppliers. The stronger your communication is with your suppliers, the stronger your relationship will be.

One of the biggest challenges to the buyer-supplier relationship is communication. 

If you’re like most buyers, your procurement team probably uses multiple platforms to communicate with suppliers. These platforms can include email, phone calls, texts, and fax. While your business can function with this system, the margin of error in your purchase order operations is high. Errors can include anything from missed PO acknowledgments to operating with inaccurate PO details. Every hiccup in your PO, AP, or RFQ process puts the buyer-supplier relationship at risk and can lead to late deliveries.

With this in mind, we’ve created a list of 3 ways to improve your supplier relationship and your ability to communicate with them.

1. Invest in a Supplier Collaboration Software

Building a relationship with your supplier may not involve face time, but it should always involve collaboration. Managing purchase orders, accounts payable, and RFQs across multiple platforms makes your supply chain vulnerable. Missing details on POs can have a severe impact on your ability to get deliveries to your customers on time. Collaboration solutions, like SourceDay, seamlessly connect buyers and suppliers in a single platform where all interactions are archived in real-time and available for both parties to see.

Through our solution, both buyers and suppliers can track every part of the PO process and communicate in a single dashboard. Alerts, notifications and even color-coded flags ensure nothing gets missed. Using SourceDay, buyers have experienced a 35% increase in on-time deliveries.

2. Make Your Software Accessible to Suppliers

For effective collaboration between buyers and suppliers, your suppliers have to adopt the same software that you are using. With SourceDay, buyers pay for the license, and their suppliers access the software for free. Suppliers are then able to streamline labor-intensive tasks, quickly acknowledge POs, and ultimately, get paid faster.

Plus, SourceDay provides all the necessary training for buyers and their vendors, making the transition simple.

3. Give Your Suppliers Feedback

Suppliers care about their service and want to know how they’re doing. Effective service leads to loyalty. SourceDay’s Supplier Scorecard solution streamlines grading vendors so you can quickly relay the good and the bad as far as their performance.

With SourceDay’s quality control dashboard, you can easily track the incoming inspection of supplier materials to determine if specifications are met. If the materials fail inspection, suppliers are quickly notified through the platform and the failing materials are then dispositioned. After the issue is resolved, buyers can score the interaction, giving suppliers an incentive to take care of any problems quickly.

Improving your supplier relationship starts with using the right tools. Updating your purchase order process by using software like SourceDay allows you to improve your communication with suppliers and meet more commitments. Learn more about SourceDay’s solution and chat with a member of our team!

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Drawing the Line Between Direct and Indirect Spend

Why is it important to know the difference between direct spend and indirect spend?

Managing both requires different skillsets and tools. We often tell our customers that direct spend, or direct materials procurement, is about supplier management and performance. But, indirect spend is about managing buyer’s spending behavior.

Direct Spend refers to the money that goes into raw materials and goods, or COGS (Cost of Goods Sold) to create the product.

Indirect Spend is the ‘back office’ purchases for the operations of the business. For example, chairs or whiteboard markers for the office.  

To put it simply, direct spend impacts your customer.

A lack of parts or supplies can shut down your business. Issues in your direct spend procurement can cause stock outages, drive up labor costs, hinder business goals, and impact customers. Real-world examples of this include the recent global descaling of Ford plants or KFC ‘s chicken shortage in the UK last year.

Problems with indirect spend play out differently though. Production is rarely stopped due to incomplete or unreceived purchases. The fact is, you can’t afford to have issues in your direct spend procurement because it impacts your customers and your ability to stay in business.

There are unique problems inherent to direct spend procurement that don’t appear in indirect spend. Understanding the difference between the two types of procurement can help you prioritize the items that should be top of mind in running your business.

Direct Spend vs. Indirect Spend

Direct Spend


  1. Refers to the purchase of any good & services used to create the product

  2. Issues directly impact production and customers

  3. Focuses on changing supplier behavior to meet more commitments

  4. Accustomed to managing changes to POs

Indirect Spend


  1. Impacts day-to-day needs for operating the business

  2. Issues only impact the business internally

  3. Focuses on changing buyer’s spending behavior within an organization

  4. Not accustomed to large volumes of changes to POs

Unlike indirect spend, direct spend systems are designed for managing changes to POs. Because even the smallest unacknowledged change can prevent the customer from receiving their order. Cloud-based, direct spend solutions like SourceDay are built to manage change. Our platform is designed to help buyers and suppliers work collaboratively using real-time information to grow their businesses.

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